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FIP and FIV in cats, what's the difference?

Updated: Jun 7


FIP and FIV in Cats are two distinct types of viruses affecting cats, but their similar symptoms can make it difficult to differentiate between the two.
Understanding the Difference Between FIP and FIV Viruses in Cats

Feline Infectious Peritonitis (FIP) and Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV) are two diseases commonly found in cats. While they share similar symptoms, they have significant differences in transmission and treatment methods. In this article, we will explore FIP treatment options, FIP medicine, the various forms of FIP in cats, FIV Symptoms, how to Diagnosis FIV in cats, and Preventing FIV transmission in cats.


FIP is a disease caused by the Feline Coronavirus (FCoV), which results in inflammation of the peritoneum, the membrane lining the abdominal cavity. This inflammation can lead to fluid buildup in the abdomen, causing symptoms such as fever, decreased appetite, weight loss, and abdominal fluid accumulation. FIP in cats also presents neurological and ocular symptoms. There are two primary forms of FIP in cats: Wet FIP and Dry FIP. Wet FIP is characterized by fluid accumulation in the abdomen, while Dry FIP is associated with neurological and ocular symptoms, such as Neurological FIP and Ocular FIP.


FIV, in contrast, is a virus that attacks the cat's immune system, caused by the feline immunodeficiency virus. Similar to HIV in humans, FIV symptoms include recurring fever, lack of appetite, mouth and gum inflammation, chronic or recurrent infections in the eyes, skin, upper respiratory tract, or bladder, constant diarrhea, persistent eye problems, seizures, and behavioral changes or signs of neurological disorders.


Diagnosing FIP involves several tests, such as FCoV A/B Test, Rivalta Test, and hematology and chemistry blood tests. FIP treatment depends on the severity and type of FIP, and FIP medicine options may vary. FIV, however, can be diagnosed through blood tests or ELISA tests. FCoV, which carries FIP, is contagious through cat fluids or feces, but FIP itself is not contagious. FIV transmission typically occurs through deep bites from an infected cat, putting outdoor cats at a higher risk. Mother cats infected with FIV can also pass it to their kittens.

Feline Infectious Peritonitis (FIP) and Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV) are two diseases commonly found in cats. While they share similar symptoms, they have significant differences in transmission and treatment methods.
The difference between FIP and FIV in cats

Preventing FIV transmission in cats can be achieved by keeping them indoors, using a leash when walking them outside, ensuring that other cats they come into contact with have tested negative for FIV, and testing newly adopted cats for FIV. FIV vaccination is not generally recommended, but you can discuss it with your veterinarian. FIV infections are most common in middle-aged cats between 5 and 10 years old, with male cats being twice as likely to contract FIV as females.


In conclusion, FIP and FIV are two distinct types of viruses affecting cats, but their similar symptoms can make it difficult to differentiate between the two. Monitoring your cat's health and seeking appropriate FIP treatment or FIP medicine when necessary is crucial. Understanding the differences between FIP and FIV, including Wet FIP, Dry FIP, Neurological FIP, and Ocular FIP, can help cat owners better manage their pets' health and seek the right treatment options.


If you want to know more about FIP Virus and its treatment, contact Basmi FIP on WhatsApp or visit our Social Media for guidance. With GS-441524, your cat can recover from FIP and live a healthy life.



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